Article

Article

Curr. Appl. Phys. 2020; 20(12): 1307-1313

Published online December 31, 2020 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cap.2020.06.026

Copyright © The Korean Physical Society.

Availability of indirect atmospheric plasma from a dielectric barrier discharge device on biofilm-forming bacteria

Na J.H., Lee J.-G., Hong S.-C., Seo J., Lee J.P., Lee Y., Kim J.-H., Na Y.-S., Lee S., Park J.-U.

Department of Pharmaceutical Science, College of Pharmacy, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul, 02447, South Korea; Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Gwanak-ro 1, Gawanak-gu, Seoul, 08826, South Korea; Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Boramae Hospital, 5 Gil 20, Boramae-ro, Donjak-gu, Seoul, 07061, South Korea; Department of Chemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gawanak-gu, Seoul, 08826, South Korea; Department of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Wonkwang University, 460 Iksandae-ro, Iksan, Jeonbuk 54538, South Korea; Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Seoul National University Boramae Hospital, 5 Gil 20, Boramae-ro, Donjak-gu, Seoul, 07061, South KoreaNa, J.H., Department of Pharmaceutical Science, College of Pharmacy, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul, 02447, South Korea; Lee, J.-G., Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Gwanak-ro 1, Gawanak-gu, Seoul, 08826, South Korea; Hong, S.-C., Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Gwanak-ro 1, Gawanak-gu, Seoul, 08826, South Korea; Seo, J., Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Gwanak-ro 1, Gawanak-gu, Seoul, 08826, South Korea; Lee, J.P., Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Boramae Hospital, 5 Gil 20, Boramae-ro, Donjak-gu, Seoul, 07061, South Korea; Lee, Y., Department of Chemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gawanak-gu, Seoul, 08826, South Korea; Kim, J.-H., Department of Pharmaceutical Science, College of Pharmacy, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul, 02447, South Korea; Na, Y.-S., Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Gwanak-ro 1, Gawanak-gu, Seoul, 08826, South Korea; Lee, S., Department of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Wonkwang University, 460 Iksandae-ro, Iksan, Jeonbuk 54538, South Korea; Park, J.-U., Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Seoul National University Boramae Hospital, 5 Gil 20, Boramae-ro, Donjak-gu, Seoul, 07061, South Korea

Correspondence to:Na, Y.-S.
Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Department of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Wonkwang University, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Seoul National University Boramae Hospital, Gwanak-ro 1, Gawanak-gu, South Korea
email: ysna@snu.ac.kr

Abstract

An investigation of the treatment effect of atmospheric cold plasma (ACP)-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) against problematic bacteria of chronic wounds is presented. To study ROS effects specifically, a vacuum chamber with a flowmeter to control the background gas composition and a mesh electrode for a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) device were used. In addition, a numerical modeling was developed to simulate the amount of ROS flux transported from the mesh electrode to determine which of the ROS species was the main factor in the treatment effect. Considering the experimental and computational results and the effective transport distance of each species, ozone could be the main factor in the experimental results. © 2020 Korean Physical Society

Keywords: Atmospheric plasma, Biofilm, Chronic wounds, Dielectric barrier discharge, Plasma simulation

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